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Employers May Use Downsizing to Retaliate

A number of workers in Texas have been cut from their jobs -- this is something that has been seen across the nation, in many different forms. Some have been fired, others laid off or let go; some have been victims of restructuring or downsizing. Though many people feel like their jobs have been unfairly taken away from them, only some can pursue legal action. These individuals may have been wrongfully terminated due to some sort of retaliation, a response that is illegal for an employer to have. When workplace safety is questionable and an employee reports this to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, it can result in such retaliation, especially if OSHA cites the company. If you have been a victim of retaliation, you should reach out to a lawyer.

According to national data, about 250,000 people lose their jobs to downsizing. Though downsizing is often reported as a way to cut costs for a company, it can and has been used to illegally remove employees from companies that blame a whistleblower for their legal issues. Instead of putting the blame where it belongs -- on the employer -- companies rationalize the situation and further oppress workers who were simply trying to enhance the safety of the workplace, likely to avoid unnecessary injuries and fatalities. It is not the employee's fault that the company was cited by OSHA, it is that of the company.

But some people who have lost their jobs due to downsizing reported nothing to regulatory administrations and did nothing that would give a company reason enough to cut their jobs, besides saving money. Some experts suggest that downsized workers shouldn't remain discouraged for long because they are not alone, many other people have been downsized, and prospective employers will understand this. Some employees use this opportunity to reevaluate their career goals, potentially shifting gears toward another option. But if you are one of the people who has been retaliated against by your employer, speak with an attorney.

Source: NWI, "Focus on the future, not the firing" Bob Moulesong, Jun. 02, 2013

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